Pages Navigation Menu

Be a Strong Advocate for Your Child and Teach Your Child How To Become An Advocate for Themselves

Posted by on May 14, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Every ADD/ADHD child needs to understand what their areas of weakness are, so they know why they may have certain difficulties rather than begin to see themselves as unintelligent. This will also make them more accepting of learning strategies that can minimize any struggles they may encounter because of these weaknesses. learning effective strategies early prevents them from falling far behind their classmates and more dedicated to giving continued effort (which is a key to success in all areas of life). This also makes finding effective solutions easier, and encourages them to ask for help when they need it, and assists them to advocate for the help they need as well. Children who learn self-advocacy skills early, are better able to be explicit, confident, and proactive in getting the resources and accommodations they need as they go through life. They also minimize any weaknesses they may have and develop their strengths to become more adaptable and successful in work and personal relationships. When we help them focus on strengths first we create greater opportunities for success and increase their self-esteem.

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

It Is Important To Learn About ADD/ADHD and How It Affects Your Child and Family

Posted by on May 14, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Because ADD/ADHD is a complex condition it is imperative that you learn as much as you can about it to help yourself and your child learn to make the most of their strengths. ADD/ADHD can present very differently from child to child (especially between girls and boys).  It can present changing challenges as a child grows, as symptoms evolve through different developmental stages (elementary school, middle school, high school, college, and into adulthood for most affecting work, marriage, and parenting). To have the most success you must educate yourself, your child, and your family about ADD/ADHD. It is important that your child become an active participant in his or her treatment and they must learn to become their own advocate as they grow. Most importantly stay focused on the positive and on creating solutions.

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

ADHD has Neurological and Biological Components Caused By a Number of Risk Factors, Including an Inherited Genetic Predisposition

Posted by on May 14, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

There is a strong genetic component to ADD/ADHD. This means it tends to run in families. Research shows that persons with ADD/ADHD have differences in there brain development and how they process and a deficiency in certain brain chemicals (particularly, the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine) these neurotransmitters determine how effectively our brain inhibits behavior, sustains attention, and controls our moods.

ADHD is not caused by poor parenting or a lack of discipline at home (although having excellent parenting skill can help ADD/ADHD learn to better self-regulate their behaviors). It is not caused by eating too much sugar or watching too much television (although high levels of sugar can negatively affect ADD/ADHD children—check out www.naturaladdtreatments.com). Understanding the neurobiological factors that contribute to ADD/ADHD can help you deal with it’s symptoms. At the same time it can eliminate any feelings of guilt or shame parents may experience raising these more challenging yet brilliant children.

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

Chronic Reversed Polarity

Posted by on Apr 5, 2014 in Articles | 0 comments

Chronic Reversed Polarity 

 

The human body is a self-contained, self-generating electrical system. Our mental processes, the immune system, and the heart are  all part of a vast system that runs electrically. Whenever electricity 

is in operation, magnetic fields are created and these fields have polarity. This means they have a north and south pole. If you put a magnet under stress, it will reverse its polarity; in essence, the north and south poles change positions. 

 

Since the human body is electrical and has a subtle magnetic field, certain conditions such as stress will reverse the body’s polarity. This condition can be temporary, yet it is often is often long-lasting and chronic. Keith R. Smith discovered that chronic polarity reversal appears to be a major factor in the cause of chronic 

fatigue syndrome, depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, auto immune diseases, cancer, ADHD, and many other conditions. 

 

Some potential signs of Chronic Reversed Polarity are: 

 

➤ Chronic stress or an Inability to Relax, Depression or Anxiety

 

➤ Headaches or Migraines 

 

➤ Difficulty concentrating, Feeling Brain Fog. or Poor Short Term Memory

 

➤ Insomnia, difficulty sleeping 

 

➤ Clumsiness or Being Accident Prone 

 

➤ Chronic Fatigue 

 

➤ Pain 

 

➤ Chronic health problems including Constipation, digestive problems or Irritable Bowel 

 

Stress plays an important role in ADD and the ability to learn. One form of stress that has greatly increased in recent years is exposure to Electromagnetic Frequency waves (EMF) from cell 

phones, Wifi and other electrical devises. Younger people are more vulnerable to EMF waves due to skull-thickness, which is maturing and growing. Evidence now suggests that fetal or neo-natal exposures to radiofrequency radiation may be associated with an increased incidence of autism. One way to protect yourself and your child against the stresses due to EMF exposure is wearing the GIALife Pendant. (For more information visit www.naturaladdtreatments.com and look for the Biological treatments in the drop-down menu). Treatment with Biomagnetism can return the body to balance. 

 
Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

Did you know that ADD/ADHD people are prone to Chronic Reversed Polarity?

Posted by on Apr 5, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Chronic Reversed Polarity 

 

The human body is a self-contained, self-generating electrical system. Our mental processes, the immune system, and the heart are  all part of a vast system that runs electrically. Whenever electricity 

is in operation, magnetic fields are created and these fields have polarity. This means they have a north and south pole. If you put a magnet under stress, it will reverse its polarity; in essence, the north and south poles change positions. 

 

Since the human body is electrical and has a subtle magnetic field, certain conditions such as stress will reverse the body’s polarity. This condition can be temporary, yet it is often is often long-lasting and chronic. Keith R. Smith discovered that chronic polarity reversal appears to be a major factor in the cause of chronic 

fatigue syndrome, depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, auto immune diseases, cancer, ADHD, and many other conditions. 

 

Some potential signs of Chronic Reversed Polarity are: 

 

➤ Chronic stress or an Inability to Relax, Depression or Anxiety

 

➤ Headaches or Migraines 

 

➤ Difficulty concentrating, Feeling Brain Fog. or Poor Short Term Memory

 

➤ Insomnia, difficulty sleeping 

 

➤ Clumsiness or Being Accident Prone 

 

➤ Chronic Fatigue 

 

➤ Pain 

 

➤ Chronic health problems including Constipation, digestive problems or Irritable Bowel 

 

Stress plays an important role in ADD and the ability to learn. One form of stress that has greatly increased in recent years is exposure to Electromagnetic Frequency waves (EMF) from cell 

phones, Wifi and other electrical devises. Younger people are more vulnerable to EMF waves due to skull-thickness, which is maturing and growing. Evidence now suggests that fetal or neo-natal exposures to radiofrequency radiation may be associated with an increased incidence of autism. One way to protect yourself and your child against the stresses due to EMF exposure is wearing the GIALife Pendant. (For more information visit www.naturaladdtreatments.com and look for the Biological treatments in the drop-down menu). Treatment with Biomagnetism can return the body to balance. 

 
Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

3. Did you know that iodine deficiencies (that cause thyroid problems) is one of the major causes of ADD/ADHD symptoms?

Posted by on Mar 21, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Research is beginning to confirm that the growing incidence of ADHD may be directly related to an iodine deficiency. Further, this research has shown that correcting iodine deficiencies in those with levels too low would translate into a decrease in ADHD symptoms and challenges. The clinical work of Dr. David Brownstein shows the frequency of iodine deficiencies to be equal in children and adults and that it occurs at 96%.

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

Did you know that if your ADD/ADHD child finds something to shine in they are more likely to succeed and show fewer symptoms?

Posted by on Mar 2, 2014 in Articles | 0 comments

Because of their symptoms ADD/ADHD children are more likely to receive a higher percentage of negative feedback than other children. Because of neurological differences they are already more attuned to tonal messages and negative signals than other children so this only heightens their poor self-esteem. By finding creative outlets of expression that a child can get passionate about there are more opportunities for them to not only feel good about themselves but also set up situations where they receive encouragement. Outlets like sports, music, building things, and the arts also allow for increased opportunities for hyper focus. This allows your child (especially when you bring attention to it)  to realize they are capable of focus and attention (in fact to higher degrees than non-ADD/ADHD children). Focus on the positive by parents and teachers reduces stress and increases the child’s ability to follow through on tasks of less interest and reduces symptoms. 

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

Did you know that gestalt (right)-brain ADD’ers will rule this next century?

Posted by on Feb 23, 2014 in Articles | 0 comments

Beneath the many assorted symptoms and challenges ADD/ADHD appears to hold is the real key that marks this difference. These person’s ability to see the big picture, connect the dots, combine disparate things into something new are trademark abilities that predict later performance in the workplace and world. The ability to be empathetic and stand in someone else’s shoes, feeling with that person’s heart, and see with their eyes along with the need and desire to derive meaning from their life and wonder what their legacy will be are all positive traits of ADD’ers and our most successful persons. 

The question is will we begin to honor, appreciate and develop these skills not only in our ADD/ADHD population but our left-brainer’s? Will we continue to drug symptoms instead of using natural interventions to address biological and neurological differences? Will we begin to reach and teach our gestalt-brain dominant ADD/ADHD population? And will we for the most part ignore the need to develop both sides of our student’s brains to create optimum outcomes and success? (Get and read The Gift of ADD: Secrets For Transforming Liabilities Into Possibilities and check out Dominance Profiles and Cogmed Working Memory Training in the store).

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

Testing For Iodine Deficiencies

Posted by on Feb 8, 2014 in Articles | 0 comments

Iodine is necessary for normal formation and regulation of the endocrine glands (e.g. ovaries and thyroid) along with normal brain development. Insufficient levels of iodine increase the risk of inadequate development and a history of learning disorders.

 

Due to increased exposure to goitrogens like bromide, chlorine derivatives, and fluoride the need for iodine has actually increased over the last 30 years. Toxicity from bromide is increasing at epidemic proportions. Diets that are high in bakery goods and pasta are one of the reasons for high levels of bromide. Bromine is detoxified from the body by iodine.

 

Since there is no perfect dose of iodine for everyone the correct dosage needs to be determined by testing for the body’s iodine status. You accomplish this by an iodine-loading test outlined in the table below.

Iodine-Loading Test

 

  1. First morning urine discarded. A baseline can be done by testing the first urine sample prior to beginning the test.
  2. Take 50 mg. of iodine/iodide (Iodoral ®) with a glass of water.
  3. Collect urine for 24 hours. Include the first morning urine sample at the end of the 24 hour collection period.
  4. Send a sample of the urine collection for evaluation of iodine status.

 (David Brownstein, © 2014)

The test works on the premise that if you saturate the body with iodine the majority of it will be excreted unless the body is deficient in iodine causing the body to absorb more of the iodine. The test typically uses 50mg. of iodine. Studies show that a 90% excretion (or 45mg.)  of the 50 mg. dose would represent a sufficient amount of iodine. A level below 90% would indicate an insufficient iodine level; In these cases iodine supplementation is recommended. The ideal is to supplement with a combination of iodine and iodide.

 

The dosage should be individualized for each person. An iodine-knowledgeable healthcare practitioner should determine the dosage. An amount between 12 mg. and 50 mg. daily is typical for an adult. Higher doses may be necessary especially for those with cancer of the thyroid, ovaries, uterus, breast, and prostate.

 MaryEllen Jirak ©2014

 

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

Iodine Deficiencies and ADHD

Posted by on Feb 8, 2014 in Articles | 0 comments

ADHD is a complicated challenge since there are many components to it (immune and learning differences, nutritional and dietary concerns, behavioral challenges, etc.) that is why it should be a requirement that all children diagnosed with ADHD have a complete nutritional and hormonal evaluation.  Most of these children respond positively to a holistic approach, which includes cleaning up the diet (which I discuss further in my two books The Gift of ADD: Secrets For Transforming Liabilities Into Possibilities and Cracking The ADD code: Why Outcomes Haven’t Changed and How They Can) and treatment for iodine and hormonal imbalances.

 

It is estimated by the World Health Organization, that about 1/3 (one third) of the world’s population is iodine deficient. Iodine deficiency can cause goiter, mental retardation, depression, increased childhood and infant mortality, and socioeconomic decline (Manner, M.G., et al, 1995).

 

The depletion of nutrients in our soil (including iodine), the reduction of salt intake, and the removal of iodine from most salt sources have increased the incidence of diseases and imbalances. In the table below are the therapeutic actions & conditions iodine can treat.

 

 

          Therapeutic Actions                                           Conditions Iodine Can Treat

 

          Antibacterial                                                                   ADD/ADHD

          Anticancer                                                                       Atherosclerosis

          Antiparasitic                                                                   Breast Diseases

          Antiviral                                                                           Dupuytren’s Contracture

         Elevates pH                                                                      Excess Mucous Production

         Mucolytic Agent                                                              Fatigue

                                                                                                      Fibrocystic Breasts

                                                                                                      Goiter

                                                                                                      Hemorrhoids

                                                                                                      Headaches and Migraine Headaches

                                                                                                      Hypertension

                                                                                                      Infections

                                                                                                      Keloids

                                                                                                      Liver Diseases

                                                                                                     Nephrotic Syndrome

                                                                                                     Ovarian Disease

                                                                                                     Parotid Duct Stones

                                                                                                     Peyronie’s

                                                                                                     Prostate Disorders

                                                                                                     Sebaceous Cysts

                                                                                                     Thyroid Disorders

                                                                                                     Vaginal Infections

(David Brownstein, MD © 2014)

Research is beginning to confirm that the growing incidence of ADHD may be directly related to an iodine deficiency. Further, this research has shown that correcting iodine deficiencies in those with levels too low would translate into a decrease in ADHD symptoms and challenges. The clinical work of Dr. David Brownstein shows the frequency of iodine deficiencies to be equal in children and adults and that it occurs at 96%.

 

Researchers in Italy compared women in iodine rich and deficient areas of Italy. Those in iodine deficient regions demonstrated reduced thyroid hormone and elevated TSH levels unlike women in iodine rich areas. Women in iodine poor regions gave birth to much higher numbers of children with impaired psycho-neurological development.

 

Additional research discovered higher levels of ADHD in these regions as well (Clin.Endocr.1005 April, 42(4)/409). A ten year follow up of children in the study showed a 69% incidence of ADHD in children born in iodine deficient locations compared to 0% in iodine sufficient areas. An 11-point decline in IQ was also noted in the children from iodine deficient areas.

 

These studies should give us pause as well as hope since correcting this deficiency is quite simple. (See article on testing ADHD children for iodine deficiencies)

MaryEllen Jirak ©2014

 

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

Iodine Deficiencies and ADD

Posted by on Feb 6, 2014 in Articles | 0 comments

 

 

ADD/ADHD persons usually have greater oxidative stress, intestinal dysbiosis (which is the breakdown in the balance between protective versus harmful intestinal bacteria), increased toxic metal burden, and immune dis-regulation are also prevalent in ADD/ADHD. While other factors also play into ADD/ADHD naturally treating the above factors can substantially reduce problem behaviors and more easily allow their natural gifts to shine through. Other biological, neurological and learning differences seen in ADD/ADHD can also be addressed in natural ways. And now recent research is demonstrating that iodine deficiencies may be the cause of many of these biological challenges.  See www.naturaladdtreatments.com for my 2 new articles addressing iodine deficiencies and testing.

 

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

What are recent studies telling us about ADD/ADHD?

Posted by on Aug 11, 2013 in Articles | 0 comments

Recent studies now show that persons with ADD/ADHD usually have greater oxidative stress, intestinal dysbiosis (which is the breakdown in the balance between protective versus harmful intestinal bacteria. Proper balance of these bacteria provides the body with the ability to fight infectious disease, and is a front line in our immune defense, provides a passive mechanism to prevent infection, and produces many vitamins particularly Vitamin B12 and Vitamin K. Acid-producing lactobacilli and bifidobacteria increase the bioavailability of minerals and decrease chances of allergies and immune problems—which are prevalent in ADD/ADHD); increased toxic metal burden, and immune dysregulation. While other factors also play into ADD/ADHD naturally treating the above factors can substantially reduce problem behaviors and more easily allow their natural gifts to shine through. Other neurological and learning differences seen in ADD/ADHD can also be addressed in natural ways. Find out about these interventions under the store on this site and drop down listings for neurological, biological and learning support.


Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

Is it unusual to see different behavior at home and school in an ADD/ADHD child?

Posted by on Aug 1, 2013 in Articles | 0 comments

It is not unusual to see different behavior in different settings. While most often the school setting is the most difficult because a child is expected to sit at a desk, change activities frequently and not allowed the movement or freedom they have come to enjoy and need at home it can be that they act out more at home after holding together all day. It will be important to learn some good discipline techniques and to make sure your child has physical outlets (movement, sports,Thai Chi, Brain Gym can all help). You will need to become aware of his triggers and watch for him ramping up so to speak so you can intervene before tantrums etc become unavoidable. A reward chart can help too. Using it to reward him for redirecting his behavior when you see it becoming disruptive can assist him to learn self-control which will be key later on. While ADD/ADHD is a gift it definitely has its challenges. It will also be important to see how he does academically. While he may not act out he may still fall behind his abilities if he compensating by spacing out. Most children who are referred in schools for ADD/ADHD are those with behavioral challenges. Many (especially girls) are more likely to display inattentive type and are never identified and most often do not perform to their ability. 

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

How do I know if my child is being noncompliant or is simply incompetent with regards to skills?

Posted by on Jul 30, 2013 in Articles | 0 comments

This is a critical question and one which can mean the difference between a child learning self-confidence and maintaining high self-esteem or becoming oppositionally defiant later on. Understanding whether a child is misbehaving because of noncompliance or because of incompetence is one of the first steps parents must take before they can foster positive behavior change. Distinguishing between noncompliance and incompetence can be difficult because of the typical variability in performance by creative risk-takers.

Clearly, when you have a child’s attention and give positive directions about using a quiet voice, if the child continues to use a loud voice, it is case of noncompliance. Natural or logical consequences would be the appropriate result and would increase future compliance to your directions. Remember that you must follow through consistently and fairly to have the necessary effect.

On the other hand, if the child complies with your direction but later needs to be reminded again, it is more likely incompetence. Incompetence needs to be dealt with through education and skill building. The child is entitled to another positive direction rather than a consequence. In this way you can celebrate several small triumphs rather than have one large failure.

I believe that noncompliant behavior often results from incompetence that is not caught early enough. Without proper intervention, the inability of children with ADD to control their impulsivity and distractibility leads to poor self-esteem, anger, and depression. This in turn easily leads to noncompliance because the children are constantly made to feel worthless and inferior. They learn to do what is expected—misbehave.

Noncompliance can be oppositional or passive. The oppositional noncompliant child openly refuses to do what is asked. The passive noncompliant youngster says he will do something, but he procrastinates or forgets to get it done. Children with ADD can demonstrate both of these tendencies at various times. Their responses are usually a result of poor self-esteem, learning preferences, anger, or depression.

Many excellent programs can help children who are significantly noncompliant. A few programs that have proven to be successful are the Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS) approach; Helping the Noncompliant Child, a program by Forehand and McMahon; Early Risers, a SAMHSA Model Program; and I Can Problem Solve. Success with such programs can be intermittent unless we develop,a true understanding of our children’s behaviors, our interactions with them, and the long-term effects of their attention problems. Therefore, it is critical to depend on more than a few techniques. You can begin with something as simple as looking at things in a fresh way. Instead of asking yourself “What’s it going to take to motivate this kid to behave differently?” ask “Why is this so hard for this child? What’s getting in his way? How can I help?”

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

If my child is showing signs of ADD/ADHd in preschool is it too early to contact a specialist?

Posted by on Jul 27, 2013 in Articles | 0 comments

No, it’s not too early, yet it is important to realize that inattention and hyperactivity are relatively common at this age and often isn’t cause for deep concern. If your child showed early signs (in infancy that were discussed above) and is experiencing serious problems at home, in social situations, or school you will definitely want to get professional assistance. An early diagnosis can be helpful in preventing other problems developing later. Working with a specialist in parenting and a functional medicine doctor or naturopath for dietary adjustments often can be enough to reduce some of the more bothersome symptoms and social issues. If family interactions become too dysfunctional it can not only affect the ADD/ADHD child negatively but erode normal family functioning between other children. Other children may feel their ADD/ADHD brother or sister is excused for behaviors or the ADD/ADHD child may be continually blamed for things whether it is their fault or not. None of these scenarios are healthy and can lead to the breakdown of family interaction and trust. 

If your child is unusually difficult to soothe or calm down consulting a pediatrician to see if other medical problems may be the cause is recommended. It is also advisable to seek professional help if your child has not begun babbling in the first year of life, speaking words in the second year, or if your child has difficulties relating to you or others since early intervention can determine if other factors need to be addressed. 

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

How can I be an advocate for my child at school to ensure he/she is getting everything he/she can and should from his teacher and the school system?

Posted by on Jul 25, 2013 in Articles | 0 comments

The first step is to become as informed about ADD/ADHD as you possibly can. Sadly, in most cases you will know more than a majority of instructors and these teachers can have misperceptions about ADD/ADHD and can therefore unwittingly cause many symptoms with their approach to your child’s challenges. 

Also take note of what works and doesn’t work for you and your child at home (ie. what are your child’s triggers, what kind of reinforcements, consequences etc. work best to maintain discipline and self-esteem). Share this information with your child’s teacher to give them ideas about what should work in the classroom as well. 

It is critical to the success of each year that it begin on a positive note or things can quickly escalate out of control. This would mean that valuable time and teachable moments can be lost. Set up a meeting with the instructor before school starts if possible or at least during the first week or 2 of each new year. During this meeting share information and materials that can be of help to the teacher and begin establishing a working relationship with lots of communication so every one stays on the same page during the year. This relationship can increase chances that the year will be successful for the teacher and your child. 

It is important to know that ADD/ADHD is not simply a neurotransmitter problem. ADD/ADHD children are unique thinker/processors with unique Dominance Profiles and working memory deficits that can greatly impair learning in the traditionally structured classroom. By understanding your child’s individual profile and providing the teacher with information on the strengths and weakness of that way of learning your child is more likely to receive instruction that makes best use of how they learn most effectively. 

Working memory deficits are found in almost all ADD/ADHD children. Your child’s working memory can be strengthened through Cogmed  Working Memory training. This training not only makes learning easier no matter what dominance profile your child has, it also improves their ability to focus and attend, be less impulsive, and have more behavioral and social skills success. Check out my free videos to learn more. 

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

How can early signs of ADD/ADHD affect a family’s (especially the mother’s) ability to parent well?

Posted by on Jul 20, 2013 in Articles | 0 comments

Parenting is already a challenging job. It becomes even more complicated when dealing with a child who is challenged with neurological, biological and learning differences. It is particularly difficult if the child is the first born. This is because the mother has no experience raising a non-ADD/ADHD who doesn’t exhibit these challenging symptoms and disruptive behaviors. When the new mother is unable to soothe her child she may begin to feel she is incompetent or a bad parent. The child’s more challenging temperament, digestive difficulties, erratic sleep patterns and other disturbances make it more difficult for positive interactions and a loving bond to form between the mother and child. It

Studies have shown that mother’s who have given birth first to a non-ADD/ADHD child who shows normal growth and development and fewer challenges is more confident in her parenting skills and will see that the ADD/ADHD child’s behaviors are not her fault. She is then able to continue to do all she can to be a good parent to the more challenging youngster and persevere despite the challenges. 

It is important for parents to understand that this is about their child not about them failing as parents. they will need to recognize that they will need to work extra hard and develop extraordinary skills as parents as well as find support systems to assist them. Without doing this they will face problems later on when developmental and self-esteem issues crop up. Implementing a multimodal intervention program will be key to avoiding later challenges and delaying the creative talents of their child from manifesting. 

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

Can the symptoms of infant ADD/ADHD adversely affect personality development and socialization?

Posted by on Jul 18, 2013 in Articles | 0 comments

Yes it can. This is one of the reasons we see higher rates of antisocial personality disorders and relationship difficulties later in the individuals life. These disorders become more likely if good parenting skills and healthy family patterns are not established early. Antisocial personality disorders are rooted in a child’s earliest relationships. these early relationships help establish the ability to empathize, have compassion for, and develop trust in others. When this isn’t established Antisocial Personality Disorders, Oppositional Defiant Disorders, etc. are more likely to be seen by the teen years. While poor parenting does not cause ADD/ADHD it can exacerbate later difficulties. However these challenges are not inevitable and there are many steps you can take to avoid these additional problems. Addressing all aspects of this gift is crucial to avoid less than optimal outcomes. It is why outcomes have not significantly changed despite drug intervention which looks only at adjusting neurological challenges. 

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

How do the symptoms of ADD/ADHD in infancy affect development later on?

Posted by on Jul 16, 2013 in Articles | 0 comments

Because all stages of development are interconnected and because early development is a time when the greatest amount of learning takes place, ADD/ADHD symptoms can have a dramatic impact on later development. Learning is easiest and fastest from womb to seven years because the brain spends most of its time in alpha and theta brain wave states allowing information from our environment to be soaked up like a sponge. When early developmental skills are not learned because   of interruption from neurological and biological disruptions the building blocks for the next level of learning are not in place to build upon. This can intensify challenges as the child grows. 

The good (and bad) news for ADD/ADHD individuals is that their brains continue to have greater amounts of alpha and theta brain waves even into adulthood than non-ADD/ADHD individuals. While this can allow them to accumulate some of the missed skills and makes them much more creative it can be a disadvantage in the classroom which requires more beta brain waves for focus, attention, and learning in abstract ways. It can also be a disadvantage in that they are more susceptible to negative programming longer than their non-ADD/ADHD peers are. this can play a role in why we see more negative outcomes for these individuals unless correct and multiple interventions are put in place. 

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

How can I get my ADD child/teen to do chores in order to develop responsibility and to demonstrate the importance of families working together?

Posted by on Jul 12, 2013 in Articles | 0 comments

Obviously getting any child to do chores can be a challenge however it can be even more challenging for CRT’s. I love what Dr. Larry silver suggests in his book Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. One in particular called “maid service” suggests telling your child that if they don’t do their assigned chores you will do them for them however for each task you perform for them you will deduct a portion of their allowance. Taking out the garbage for instance might deduct fifty cents. Putting their clothed in the hamper another fifty cents. When it is time to pay allowance you show the sheet of deductions and pay the remainder. I suggest posting the sheet with plastic coating on the refrigerator and keeping the tally there. For hard to “convince” kids it might be good to set a routine of having them check this list each day after school or before or after dinner to keep the expectations fresh in their minds and clearly letting them know where they stand. This allows repetition which is important and reduces the likelihood that allowance day is a complete disappointment. 

Another great idea is to have a “lock box” where items left lying around can be placed and held for a period of time. After having a valuable possession unavailable for a few days should begin to increase the chances of them putting these items away without needing reminders. 

A great suggestion for elementary school children in relation to keeping their rooms neat is to assist them the first time to clean and organize the room to their best ability. Then take pictures of each area and drawers and post the pictures in those areas so when you ask them to clean their room they understand what that means and what it looks like. Otherwise their idea of a clean room will be very different from what you are hoping for or expecting. 

Always remember not to get too hung up on details and perfection. You may have to ease your own standards recognizing that the follow through and effort are more important than a set standard.  These kids have enough to deal with in regards to their challenges and are usually challenged by organizational skills. Allowing a little slack and taking time to use encouragement and self direction.  and picking your battles will keep self esteem higher and the chances for long term success more likely. Choose chores that allow for the greatest likelihood for nothing breeds success like success.

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

Why do so many ADDers become involved addictive and risk taking behaviors that can be problematic?

Posted by on Jul 9, 2013 in Articles | 0 comments

As you probably are aware from my books and website information I call ADD individuals Creative Risk Takers (CRTs). This is because of their amazingly creative approach to life, their unique way of perceiving and processing the world around them and their fearlessness in taking risks. These risks can be creative ones that lead to life altering discoveries and inventions when they are nurtured in positive ways. They can also be risks that put them in danger when they are made to feel different in a negative way and face school and social challenges.  

Because of biological and neurological differences CRTs often feel out of balance and search for artificial ways to bring their bodies into balance. This is why the right diet and exercise/movement are crucial. If they receive a lot of negative and unproductive feedback and feel ostracized from the family and society a psychological component can play a factor in their addictive or negative risk-taking behavior. When they receive negative feedback in school and find learning challenging because of their atypical ways of processing and different Dominance Profiles risk taking behaviors become a way of escaping the pain of failure or finding new ways to be accepted. This is why it is essential that the parent a child understand the gifts and challenges of ADD and understand how they best learn in order to take “add-vantage” of their strengths. Cogmed Working Memory Training also improves attention and the ability to learn in non-dominant ways increasing the chances for school and social success. 

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More

Can the signs of ADHD be seen in infants and if so what are these signs?

Posted by on Jul 8, 2013 in Articles | 0 comments

Yes, the signs of ADHD can sometimes be seen in infants—yet is is important to know that these signs will not always mean that a child will have ADHD in later years. ADHD infants can show extreme and more frequent fussiness. They may have a tendency to have frequent crying bouts of greater intensity and longer duration than other babies. While colic is not unusual for newborns, ADHd babies are prone to cry more excessively and for a longer time. These children can be almost impossible to soothe. No amount of rocking, gentle talking, walking, or singing can get them to settle down. This was true of my own son and it can be exhausting and challenge a parent’s confidence in their ability to handle care taking. 

Research on this points out that a mother’s desperate interventions and the crying episodes themselves, can be troublesome because they cause higher times of arousal and fewer of peaceful interaction between mother and child, which is important to the child’s emotional development. Excessive periods of crying can also impair the child’s cognitive development as well because it reduces the time the child is able to explore and learn from the environment around them. 

 Often we see sleep disturbances in these children as well through at least early childhood. Some can be very sleepy and unresponsive in the early months while more often they have difficulty falling asleep and are overactive during sleep. Many who were more restless also tended to awake with a start and a crying bout that was difficult to soothe would ensue. 

Difficulty turning off external stimuli can be a reason for these sleep difficulties. The difficulty in turning off external stimuli often continues into childhood and adulthood. Since there is overlap between parts of the brain controlling sleep and attention it isn’t surprising to see how these two conditions can be present in ADHD. 

Another potential sign of ADHD in infancy is feeding problems. This can be anything from crying while being fed to challenges suckling, or annoying finickiness. some infants may also have unusual eating schedules while most babies tend to have fairly regular timetables. 

The cause of these challenges are numerous such as an over agitated physiological state. It is possible that it can also be due to the sense of trust and comfort between mother and child has been disrupted. This sense of comfort is crucial to the child to enable him to feed well. It is extremely rare that feeding difficulties will lead to poor nutrition. The major concern is the effect it may have on the mother-child bond. 

Some other possible signs of ADHD in infancy are poor vocalization, atypical inattention and lack of cuddling response. It is usual for infants within the fist year of life to use vocalization as a precursor to speech. Many ADHD children do not begin this vocalization until well after their first birthday. They often are delayed in speaking their first words as well. 

While infants and toddlers possess short attention spans it is usual for most two and three year olds to sit for short stories and games. ADHD children however are bored and squirmy in just a couple of minutes. 

ADHD infants also tend not to be cuddly. They fuss and squirm and appear to dislike being held. This can be related to an atypical neurological system and while it can be understood it can still lead to challenges in the mother-child relationship and shake the mother’s confidence in her parenting ability especially if the child is her first since she has no other experience with which to relate it. 

Facebook Twitter Email
Read More